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  • Will Google’s Mobilegeddon Hurt My Small Business? What Should I Do NOW?

    Monday, April 27, 2015 by
    Are you ready, friends? Mobilegeddon is upon us.
    Don’t worry, your new smartphone hasn’t finally become sentient (that we know of), but there are big changes ahead. Before you reach for your tinfoil hat, there are a few things you should know. Google tweaked its search algorithm on Tuesday. From now on, sites that aren’t mobile-friendly -- meaning ones that have text that's too small, take a long time to load, or are generally hard to navigate -- will see their search rankings plummet. If your site isn’t optimized for mobile, you’re about to experience a huge drop in search traffic. Not great, obviously, but here’s why it’s a very big deal: Approximately 86% of all U.S. smartphone users search via Google. There are 177 million websites covered by Google search. If you’re not optimized for those mobile users, you’re going to get lost in a very large crowd. Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered.  

    Step 1

    Find out if your site is mobile-friendly. Check this free, instant mobile-friendly test ASAP.  

    Step 2

    If your site isn’t ready to go, don’t panic. We can help. Consider us your guide through this post-apocalyptic mobile wasteland. We’ll make your site mobile-friendly within a few days, helping you avoid any major losses in traffic or revenue (Google will notice the change and you’ll quickly regain your search ranking). But you’ve got to move quickly. Contact our expert design team for a FREE consultation by calling 844-271-2301 or simply click the button below:

    Rescue Me From Mobilegeddon!

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  • Forecasting The Next Internet Evolution – Web 3.0

    Tuesday, November 18, 2014 by
    Web 3.0

    Amidst our globalized world where everything and everyone is getting connected online, it's easy to get caught up in cyberspace and forget that you are using a technology barely fifty years old. That’s right, the Internet originated in the early 60’s and yet the Web seems to now infiltrate every facet of our everyday lives. Be it in your content consumption, your car, your home, or even your own body.

    Integrating growing technologies and the best methods, the Internet is truly evolving faster than we could ever have imagined, not just becoming a larger part in our lives, but life itself. And thus, I dare introduce to you, the latest prediction as to the Internets next grand step — Web 3.0.


    Web 1.0

    Before we get caught up in the future, it is best to first lay the groundwork, and understand from what Web 3.0 is even building when it first boomed in personal and commercial use in the early 90’s. Long regarded as “the Static Web,” the first generation was akin to a library network where you could only access information, not change it. Though it was simple, it helped fortify the infrastructures and make it more accessible to the masses through the use of web and markup languages like JavaScript and HTML, HTTP protocols, and website and browser commercialization. Basically, this was where all the leg work was done to ensure stability, availability, and approachability.


    Web 2.0

    “Wait,” you’re thinking “so when did Web 2.0 happen?” Believe it or not, you’re reading this on 2.0 right now. Although Web 2.0 leads you to believe that you somehow downloaded some official upgrade from the 1.0 static version without knowing it, be informed that there is no formal patch or update.

    Rather, Web 2.0 is a blanket term for the generation of interactive social media functions on most modern sites. Instead of a basic webpage that only allows passive content viewing, Web 2.0 incorporates a virtual community where the user may engage in a dialogue and interact with the site’s creator and others; for example, a 2.0 site could be a product’s site with a review board, a blog with a comments section, or even an Ask-Me-Anything page on Reddit. Also known as the Social Web or the Mobile Web, 2.0 strives to be a communication tool for collaborating and sharing with one another-- people connecting with people.


    Web 3.0

    Building upon 2.0’s notion of connecting people, the next generation will attempt to link us with information and be a “Smart Web.” Though some are skeptical at the very mention of artificial intelligence, most of us subscribe to the idea that technology, science, and people are all working symbiotically at an unprecedented rate to create more efficient tools. Whether or not this means sentient, free-thinking machines and The Singularity one day is up for debate, but what is clear, is that humans are using the Internet much like an extra brain. And this is precisely where Web 3.0 comes in — it’s a “Semantic Web” that would provide a uniform framework so that data could be shared, analyzed, and reapplied across all applications and platforms for unlimited function, maximum effectiveness, and with minimal human interaction. This essentially means that there would be a such a sophisticated element in the web that it could actually “understand” you and interpret what you want.

    Sci-fi crazy nonsense? Some may think so, but I think it is closer than most people would care to believe. Take Siri for example. She is a “Knowledge Navigator” that utilizes a natural language user interface that adapts to individual preferences and eventually customizes results for you. Now if you can consider an Internet experience that would combine this technology with all your personalizations collated and surmised from Big Data collection, it doesn’t seem so far fetched. Through the sites that you frequent, the past searches you have made, products you have bought, links you have posted, pages you have liked, personal descriptors you have provided, a semblance of the user’s identity is formulated. It then uses this personalized data as a metric in which to measure, screen, and ultimately select what is best suited to your needs. In layman's terms, Web 3.0 will attempt to be an online version of yourself that does all of your surfing for you.


    The Future of the Web

    The convergence of emerging and developing technologies will continue to reshape, innovate, and disrupt current web standards; however, it is imperative to remain objective to a point with its role. As technology becomes ubiquitous, it will be increasingly difficult to ask ourselves the hard questions, like are we missing a natural and organic method to our own madness by letting the Internet pervade all stages of humanity?

    This is not to say that we should be wary of The Terminator or The Matrix coming true (if it hasn't already), but rather ask if there ever should be lines drawn. In light of Edward Snowden’s leaked government documents on mass surveillance and data mining, it is safe to say that technology is quickly becoming a double-edged sword that every person will have to wield. Will it be the machete that cuts a path or will it be the blade in our own Seppuku? The choice is ultimately ours.

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  • SSLv3 Security Vulnerability aka POODLE

    Tuesday, October 14, 2014 by
    Tonight Google announced a flaw in the design of SSL v3. We have been tracking this issue after we heard whisperings in private security circles last week. Upon disclosure of the details we began remediating immediately. The vast majority of end users should not experience any issues as a result of the changes we’re making. In fact, Google estimates this change will affect less than 1% of the internet. (The SSL 3.0 protocol is almost 15 years old but has remained in place to support users running older browsers.) The attack vector for this vulnerability has prerequisites and is very sophisticated. As such, the real world severity is far below the recent Heartbleed & Shellshock vulnerabilities. Check out Google’s Security blog for details. If you would like to be 100% protected, you can disable SSLv3 in your browser settings. Information on how to do this in a few popular browsers can be found here.  
    Patrick Pelanne is Endurance’s Vice President in charge of System Operations. Previously he has served as HostGator’s Chief Operating Officer and HostGator’s Deputy Chief Technical Officer.

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  • The Shell Shock Vulnerability

    Thursday, September 25, 2014 by

    The bad guys are unfortunately at it again. Today the Internet lit up with news of a new vulnerability, officially named "CVE-2014-6271," but more widely-known as "Shell Shock," a reference to the environment exploited, known as a shell.. The shell in question is called BASH, itself an acronym for Bourne Again SHell. Nearly all Linux servers in the world have BASH installed; it is the most common shell in use today. A shell itself is what is used to interact with the operating system via command line.

    Before we proceed, you should know that all HostGator servers have been patched as of this writing. We identified the issue very early-on and developed the necessary solution for our environment. We are, of course, continuing to monitor the situation and will react appropriately should the need arise.

    As with any security or vulnerability risk, it is important to reiterate the importance of practicing good security to the extent of your ability as an end user. Always use secure passwords (you know the drill: upper- and lowercase letters, numbers and special characters), always keep any third-party scripts (such as WordPress, Joomla, etc.) up-to-date, and always uses the latest version of any software that you utilize... because the truth is that often software is updated strictly for security patch purposes.

    Should the need arise, we will update this blog post accordingly. Otherwise, stay safe out there on the Interwebs!Try HostGator Today!